How to Engage #VCs – A Primer for #Entrepreneurs

I’m very surprised at how many founders think that we’re jerks when they, in fact, are acting like wild animals.

Successful entrepreneurs know how to engage VCs. We’re not some elusive species.  We’re human just like everyone else, and yet I’m very surprised at how many founders think that we’re jerks when they, in fact, are acting like wild animals. This primer is designed to help entrepreneurs understand VCs a little better in the hopes that we can have more meaningful interactions and avoid some of the blunders that cost entrepreneurs a funding opportunity. Quite frankly, these aren’t just things that drive VCs nuts, they are basic rules for being a good person.

  1. Don’t talk to VC’s when you’re drunk. OK, this seems obvious; however, you’d be surprised how many times drunk founders approach VCs at mixers. For some reason, there is a lot of booze at start-up and VC events that some people enjoy just a little too much. I’m not sure who thought it was a good idea to mix these two things, but I strongly suggest you avoid the bar if you want to impress anyone. I once had a drunk guy come up to me at SWSW and declare, “so you’re one of those {expletive] VCs I’m supposed to be networking with so I can get my company funded, so lets talk.” Needless to say, I moved on.
  2. If you want funding, ask for my advice, don’t ask me for money. It is surprising how often people lead with the money question, and that is just poor manners not to mention bad communication strategy. If you want me to be interested in what you’re doing, ask me for my advice and let’s both find out if I can help you. Look for smart money that will be able to assist your company to grow, and if I see you doing that, I’m more likely to be interested in you also.
  3. If I don’t answer the phone, don’t keep calling over and over (same for texting). Seems like a simple thing, right? And yet, on one deal we were pretty much ready to sign one day when the founder kept calling and calling until my partner and I were just begging for him to stop. He was pestering us to sign the funding agreement, and we were very preoccupied with a credit facility emergency with a different portfolio company that had to be addressed. Our investment in the other company was very significantly greater, and had to be the higher priority. We realized after many back-to-back calls from him that he didn’t respect our time, that things would only get worse if we did the deal and so we decided to walk away from the deal. If founders are jerky up front, things usually don’t get better after we give them money. So just show some good phone manners and respect my time in the same way you would expect.
  4. Don’t monopolize the conversation. Another no-brainer, but one that is repeatedly violated, most often at events where a VC is in conversation with a group of founders from different companies. Typically, we will try to get to know everyone by asking questions to each person about their company and what they’re doing to change the world. Invariably, one or two people in the group think that this is a competition to see who can one-up, interrupt and dominate the conversation. Instead, introduce what you do and ask others the same. VCs will notice that you prefer to learn than lecture, a good attribute in a founder.
  5. Get value from the “no”. If I turn you down, don’t be a jerk. It is OK to ask why I’m not interested, and even to ask if I know a VC that might be interested, but it is not cool to just roast me. VCs say no 95% of the time or more. It is just a simple matter of supply and demand, nothing personal. However; I’m impressed when someone is thoughtful enough to thank me for my time and consideration, then asks if I can share feedback or suggest another VC that might be interested in the investment. That is smart. If I take the time to listen to fully evaluate your company, I started with the idea that this might work. If it doesn’t end that way, ask me why. I may not always feel like I can share, indeed there may be a confidential reason I can not provide, but it doesn’t hurt to ask me why. If you do, you may get valuable feedback to improve your business model or help you realize how your company is perceived. Furthermore, asking if I know anyone who might be interested in your company may result in a referral to a good funding source. So please resist the urge to assume we’re jerks for not giving you money, and get some value from the “no”.
  6. Avoid superlatives, balderdash and hyperbole. Wild claims and broad statements are usually a sign that the entrepreneur is either overconfident, foolish or dishonest . I went to a pitch once where the founder stated that they were the first company to do something when I knew, for a fact, they were not. I knew because I founded a company based upon that same business plan almost ten years before, and sold it to a strategic seven years later. There were, in fact, a lot of competitors, and by stating they were the first, the best, etc., they just showed that they were ignorant of the real market and totally unprepared for funding. Please know the limits of your technology as well as your competitive marketplace, and be prepared to discuss them with honesty and integrity, avoiding the breathless reporting of meaningless, management jargon.
  7. Don’t turn the one minute elevator pitch into five minutes. If a VC gives you a time limit for your pitch, please observe it strictly, unless the VC invites you to go into overtime. This happens a lot on pitch days when companies exceed their allotted time. Look, I know you have a lot to say, but the ability to concisely deliver a compelling message is one of the best indicators that a founder will be successful. Doing so shows that you know how to sell, and respect the time of the person you’re talking to. If you don’t respect other’s time, it also speaks to a lack of empathy and possibly integrity.
  8. Don’t bring up valuation unless I ask first. I previously stated that you shouldn’t lead with money, but let’s be frank: don’t bring it up unless asked first. Talking about your company valuation is kind of like bragging about how much you paid for your pants. No one wants to hear about it, unless they intend to buy some for themselves. So, don’t waste valuable time talking price, until you’ve sold me on the value of the pants themselves. Once I’m convinced that you have a company worth exploring further, I’ll ask and you’ll know that I’m really interested. That is a good signal for entrepreneurs that my interest is piqued, so make the most of it.
  9. Don’t trash talk other VCs or angel investors. Investing is a team sport. Funds don’t go it alone, and we prefer cooperation more than most industries because it reduces risk and improves returns for everyone. We know that it is in the interest of all to get as many smart people as we prudently can to advise and help a portfolio company. VCs invest in teams, with each round of funding bringing in other VC firms who have value and experience that is relevant to the asset. That means that most VCs are frequently friends and serial business partners. I respect them a lot, and value them highly. If you think I’ll be impressed when you trash talk the last office that said “no” to you, well I’m not impressed. That kind of behavior shows that you may have trouble working with other people, and reading a market, both are very bad traits in founders that we seek to avoid.
  10. Don’t show up at anything personal hoping to connect with me, like my kids athletic event, or heaven help you if you knock at my home. Nobody likes a stalker. I’m more likely to call the cops on you than even consider funding your company. Another no brainer, and yet I have more than one example where people tried to pitch to me while I was trying to watch my kids play sports at school. It is nice if you realize that your kids team and my kids team are in the same league, but please, let’s just enjoy the game. Use this time to show me that you can set appropriate boundaries and allow me to enjoy some precious time with my family. Don’t be a stalker.
  11. Google me, find out what I’m interested in, and engage me in a conversation beyond your company. Some might find this creepy cyber-stalking, but I just consider it good recon. If you know the people you want to meet, you’re more likely to be able to build a foundation of trust. Find a genuine area of common interest and build upon it. I’m impressed with someone who tells me that they googled me and discovered an area of common interest and we can chat about that for a while. An important caveat: don’t try to fake it. Disingenuous interest is easily seen through if you only have a quick, Wikipedia education of something I’ve enjoyed my whole life.
  12. Don’t go on and on about where you attended college. I don’t care if you went to Harvard, please show me what you can do. Your education is nice, but there are a lot of people who emphasize it too much, as if education is some kind of guarantee that they are smart. And let’s face it, Harvard is a nice school, a good fall back if you can’t get into the University of Chicago, but where you go to school is not as important as what you are doing with that education. Remember, a lot of smart people don’t go to top tier schools, and will work you under the table. Hungry, resourceful, hardworking brilliance is something VCs look for in founders. Think smart, gritty and determined, not educationally stunted by virtue of lofty expectations with little substance to back it up.
  13. Smile. Yep, I said it. Smile. It is amazing how by just being happy, and feeling good, you subtly influence others to do the same. Smiling is free, and appreciated by all. Launching a start-up company is a full-contact, extreme sport. So, please show that you enjoy the challenge, and help your founding team to stay positive in the face of their challenges. Changing the world is hard but rewarding, so make sure you enjoy the ride.

The Multi-Trillion Dollar Opportunity

Want to be wealthier? Stop being a jerk-face to #women.

America has a multi-trillion dollar problem that just hit home for me. My daughter was sexually harassed by another student at school, and worse, the school didn’t protect her when they knew it was going on.

When examining why some economic agents like companies, churches and schools continue to protect sexual predators, I’ve come to realize that this problem is probably the single largest drag on the global economy (at least the largest I’ve ever seen) and that our legal system provides warped, perverse incentives that perpetuate this perversion.  The cost to our society of this broken system is staggering.  And yet society continues to look the other way to a situation that reminds me of the old story about the gardener and the rabbit. It goes something like this:

Once there was a gardener who woke up every morning to discover that a rabbit ate much of his crop the night before. He tried everything to get rid of it, but the clever rabbit eluded him night after night. Finally, in desperation, the gardener built a strong fence around his garden, even digging a portion underground, to keep the rabbit out. Supremely confident in his fine fence, he slept well that night, only to awake and discover that the rabbit ravaged his beautiful garden once again. He had fenced in the rabbit the day before.

Like the farmer, our tort laws regarding sexual harassment are fencing in the rabbit, and providing incentives to churches, schools and workplaces to protect harassers.

So, let’s look closer at the perverted incentives for schools, churches and companies (which I will call social agents). If a person commits sexual harassment, and if anyone at a social agent had any inkling that that person was a perv, then the social agent bears some liability for the perv’s actions since it was foreseeable that harassment would take place. However, social agents and individuals tend to want to see the best in people, so when perv’s do something pervy, we try to explain it as “we must have just misunderstood what he/she meant”. That is because we are nice.

Predators depend upon our kindness to do their dirty deeds. I’m not suggesting that we stop being nice, but I think how we respond to inappropriate behavior must change.

First, we need to speak up when boundaries are crossed and not care if we offend. If a man or woman in your office puts their hand on your back or shoulder, that is crossing the line. You don’t need to touch people to do most jobs, and should only do so when it is required as a part of your job description and, even then, minimize this as much as possible. There is no such thing as an OK sexual joke at the office (or at home for that matter). Grooming people by talking around the edges on mature subject matter is not subtle, it is blunt and we don’t like it. Stop doing it now. It’s time to grow up and start respecting people appropriately.

Second, in today’s Donald Trump school of management, tort laws provide cover to economic agents who pride themselves by saying that they are protecting innocent men from the wild accusations of an accuser when really, they are just protecting their bottom line. This encourages the victim blaming and cover-ups that we see in the news every freakin’ day. Current tort law “fences in the rabbit”, by providing companies legal incentives to align with predators to fight off harassment claims to avoid paying damages. Instead, we need to look at the REAL damages.

Social agents incorrectly assume that the biggest harassment cost they need to avoid is financial damage from lawsuits. This false belief encourages them to deny harassment claims and fend off harassment accusations with no thought to the emotional and personal cost to the victims. In fact, the far bigger expense is the economic loss of productivity and the broken lives of their employees, investors and customers due to their policies that fence in rabbits.

At the macroeconomic level, ranges of the GDP cost due to gender discrimination and harassment vary between 10% and 25%. Given that global GDP is around 78 trillion dollars, we’re talking about 8 to 20 trillion dollars in lost global income creation each year due to harassment and discrimination. In contrast, we fret about the billions of dollars we spend defending lawsuits from harassment. Our priorities are wrong.

Social agents only hedge these defensive costs with defensive expenditure: insurance coverage, harassment training for employees, lawsuit settlements and, if they’re super progressive, on-site counselors to help those affected by sexual harassment. However, I believe that the best defense is a good offense. Let’s do something to get the 20 trillion dollars, please.

I would like to call upon our elected officials to pass new tort laws to permit and encourage persons sexually harassed to work with social agents to pursue justice against sexual predators together. This can be done by permitting and encouraging churches, schools, and companies to sue their students and employees who harass, and recover damages commensurate with the social cost, the total social cost -not just the defensive expenses. It is time for pervs to pay up or smart up. In this way, social agents have an economic incentive to identify and root out sexual harassment because they will share the benefit of legal actions against those who harass. Harassers have an incentive to change their behavior, and the homes that foster future harassers have economic losses to incentivize them to change their ways.

What I hope you now understand is that sexual harassment is an economically expensive epidemic, and the emotional and psychological cost to our wives, daughters, and girlfriends is incalculably higher. So, let’s shift that expense to those who create it, and make it possible for our churches, schools and companies to recover damages from those who create the problems.

When groping results in the loss of your parents 401(k), maybe parents, clergy and managers will stop saying, “boys will be boys”, excusing Trumpian “locker room banter” and begin teaching proper respect for women. Furthermore, suing predators will become an effective way for social agents to capture the expenses they bear to treat harassment victims who often require special accommodation to cope with school and the PTSD or other problems harassment creates in their lives. Better yet, maybe my daughters will be able to live in a world where their contributions are valued by society and they can live without fear.

Furthermore, when we replace faux corporate hand-wringing and cringing with “ka-ching” whenever a crude joke is told in the office, and the offenders lose real money to their employers, people will stop telling crude jokes, putting inappropriate hands on backs, grooming victims and doing other macro-aggressions. No one is trying to stop appropriately asking out a coworker on a date, it just needs to be done the right way, don’t be a perv.

In short, it is time we make harassment the problem of the perpetrators, and enable our social institutions to go after them to the economic and emotional benefit of all. Enough is enough.

Why Start Ups Need to Understand Consumer Surplus

Many start-ups fail because they can’t generate sufficient consumer surplus. What the heck is it anyway?

When someone says, “consumer surplus”, I strongly doubt that the first thing that comes into your mind is a burning urgency to make your customers happy.  And yet, it should.

Julesdupuit
My man Jules

Consumer surplus was pioneered by a French engineer, Jules Dupuit, in the 1840s.  He proposed the idea that the difference between what you would be willing to pay for something, and what you actually pay for it, is a benefit to you the consumer.  This is a surplus in value, that makes you happier.  He called it, consumer surplus.  For example, you may be willing to pay a lot more for that cool phone in your pocket than you really paid for it. I’m hoping you didn’t steal it, that would be illegal surplus, but I digress.

When you create a new company providing a product or service, you have to think about consumer surplus.  If your offering does not generate a massive amount of consumer surplus, beyond other substitutes and competitors in the market, then no one will buy your new stuff and your company will fail.

However, if you can aggressively price your service where people feel like they’re getting a steal, then you can create a position for yourself and actually sell something (assuming you’re even charging money to the customer).  Of course, Mark Zuckerberg decided to give Facebook away for free, thus creating massive consumer surplus for the billions of people using his service and not paying one thin dime for it.

However, Zuckerberg also creates a massive consumer surplus in another market: advertising.  Before Facebook, it was pretty tough to find customers who fit your companies demographic and consumer profile.  Most companies did mass mailings to zip codes where they suspected most of the readers had the most affinity for their product/service, or took out massive media campaigns most people saw and ignored since it didn’t apply to them.  This advertising was like firing a shotgun into a crowd and hoping you got your target.  Not only that, it was very expensive to reach everyone, and that was your only option.  For advertisers, Facebook created the opportunity to identify your most likely customers with pinpoint precision, and then only buy the marketing that specifically focused on them.  In this way, advertisers were able to save money over traditional campaigns, and get better, measurable results on their advertising (read: boat loads of additional consumer surplus in the advertising market).

So, now that you understand that to grow your business and sell a ton of cool stuff, you need to find ways to increase consumer surplus for your customers as much as you can.  Now, look over at your business partner and say, “hey buddy, lets start to brainstorm how we can create more consumer surplus.” If he looks at you funny, please share this post.  Well, even if he doesn’t, you probably should share it anyway.  It is a nerdy/cool article.